Tag Archives: Southern cooking

Pressed Chicken with Okra Succotash

Pressed Chicken with Okra Succotash at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

If you’re a regular reader of Martha Stewart Living, you know about one of my favorite features of the magazine – the recipe cards. It’s a sheet of four recipe cards that you can easily remove from the magazine, tear into index sized cards, and slip into your bag to take to the grocery store. This month I’ll be featuring a few healthy and easy to make recipes from the recipe cards from the September 2014 issue of Martha Stewart Living, like this week’s Pressed Chicken with Okra Succotash.

This recipe uses a rather unusual way to “press” the chicken while cooking, using a heavy, weighted skillet to do so. Make sure you read the recipe thoroughly and have all the equipment on hand – parchment paper, extra skillet, and meat thermometer. I think you’ll find the method a great way to get chicken thoroughly cooked without burning the outside. And I’m sure the kids will soon call your pressed chicken, “Mom’s yummy smooshed chicken.” Let ‘em!Recipes from the September 2014 issue of Martha Stewart Living featured at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

Okra and suffering succotash!

Pressed Chicken with Okra Succotash obviously features okra, which I love cooking with as well as eating, even before I moved to the South. I recommend that you buy frozen over fresh and precut over whole as it’ll save you so much prep time. Plus, I find that frozen okra is much cheaper than fresh okra. (Assuming that you can even buy fresh okra in your area, that is!) You can use okra in stir fry and curries along with the other vegetables you’d normally use.

Okra is rich in dietary fiber, minerals, and vitamins like vitamin A, B-6, C, and K, niacin, thiamin, and anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene and lutein. It’s also low in calories. Okra is also a good source of foliates, iron, calcium, manganese and magnesium.

We’ve all heard of, “Suffering succotash!” as exclaimed by Sylvester, the Looney Tunes cartoon cat. But did you know that succotash is a dish made up of corn, lima beans and maybe some other vegetables like tomatoes, bell pepper, and onions? There are many recipes out there, but you can also find bags of succotash in your frozen food section that’s just perfect for adding to stir fries, curries, pasta, or sautéing as a side dish with a little bit of buttery spread and grated Pecorino Romano cheese.

Pressed Chicken with Okra Succotash at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

Pressed Chicken With Okra Succotash

From the September 2014 issue of Martha Stewart Living

Ingredients

  • 1 whole chicken (about 3 1/2 pounds), cut into 10 pieces
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 6 ounces okra, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
  • 8 ounces frozen lima beans, thawed and drained
  • 2 ears corn, kernels cut from cob (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1/2 green bell pepper, ribs and seeds removed, chopped (3/4 cup)
  • 1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
  • 1/3 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped, plus more for serving

Directions

  1. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Swirl in 1 tablespoon oil. Add chicken, skin-side down. Top with a parchment round; weight with another heavy skillet and canned goods. Cook until golden on skin side, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low. Flip chicken; cook (with parchment and weighted skillet) until a thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh (without touching bone) registers 165 degrees, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a plate, reserving pan juices.
  2. Return skillet to medium-high heat. Swirl in remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Add okra, beans, corn, bell pepper, and onion; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are golden in spots, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat; stir in vinegar, then basil. Serve chicken with succotash, pan juices, and more basil leaves.
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 10 Minutes
Total Time: 40 Minutes
Servings: Serves 4
  • Serving size: 1/4 of recipe

Photography: Bryan Gardner. Picture and recipe used with permission.

Saffron Braised Celery and Grilled Fish with Hot Sauce Buerre Blanc

Grilled Fish with Hot Sauce Buerre Blanc and Saffron Braised Celery from A New Turn in the South at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

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Braised Not-So-Short Short Ribs with Hominy Stew from A New Turn in the South

Braised Not-So-Short Short Ribs with Hominy Stew from A New Turn in the South | At This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

This month’s selection from Hugh Acheson’s cookbook, A New Turn in the South: Southern Flavors Reinvented for Your Kitchen, was another attempt to use up something we had in the freezer – a three pound rack of beef short ribs. It was one of those “Manager’s Specials” my husband purchased at Kroger – you know, the package of meat that’s quickly approaching it’s due date and has been drastically reduced in price. I know my husband probably thought “barbeque!” but I thought braised short ribs instead.

However, these short ribs weren’t very short. In fact, they were twice as long as what would be served in Hugh’s restaurant. Lacking a band saw, I decided to make due and forge ahead with the ribs as is. So instead of two little elegant rib pieces, I had to serve up Fred Flintstone sized ribs instead. No biggie.

So, when buying ribs, make sure you’d have enough to serve one rib to each person. (The rack I had consisted of six ribs and was three pounds, so I doubled the recipe.) If I was buying ribs, I’d ask my butcher for four ribs weighing in at 1 1/2 pounds – and I would ask to have the ribs cut in half.

Weeknight cooking strategy

This recipe takes four to five hours to make, so it’s something you’d make on the weekend. However, you could make it during the week with a little planning. Here’s how:

Evening 1 – after dinner, prepare your “mise en place” – your chopped vegetables, measured seasonings, measured out liquids, etc. Place everything in small bowls or measuring cups, cover with plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator. This will take you 30 to 45 minutes including clean up time.

Evening 2 – while cooking dinner (if possible) or after, cook up steps 1 through 10. Place ribs back in the Dutch oven and store in the pot in the refrigerator. Also, don’t bother skimming the fat off the braising liquid. By storing it in the refrigerator overnight, you’ll have a thick, congealed layer of fat on the top, which you can spoon off. So much easier and more healthy, too! This will take 3 to 3 1/2 hours including clean up and storage time.

Evening 3 – cook up steps 11 through 17 and serve. You may need to heat ribs in the stew 5 minutes longer since they’ll be cold from the refrigerator. This part will take 25 to 30 minutes.

Braised Not-So-Short Short Ribs with Hominy Stew from A New Turn in the South | At This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

A note on hominy and Dutch ovens

Hominy is made from dried corn that’s been soaked and cooked in an alkaline solution, usually limewater, and hulled. Here in the Georgia, I was able to find canned hominy – both white and yellow variations – in the canned vegetable aisle near the beans. If your store doesn’t stock hominy in that aisle, try the Hispanic section or buy it at a Hispanic market as hominy is a popular ingredient in pozole soup.

Since the short ribs have to be cooked both on the stove top, then in the oven, you need to have cookware with a lid that will work in both. I used my two ancient Le Creuset 5 1/2-Quart Round French Ovens, since I doubled the recipe. But secretly I would have loved to have a Le Creuset 7 1/4-Quart French Oven or a couple of Le Creuset’s 5-Quart Round Braisers. If wishes were fishes…

If you don’t have a Dutch oven, you can sear the ribs in a skillet and transfer them to a casserole dish with a lid for braising.

A New Turn in the South

Braised Not-So-Short Short Ribs with Hominy Stew from A New Turn in the South | At This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

Not-So-Short Short Ribs with Hominy Stew

Based on Hugh Acheson’s Braised Short Ribs with Hominy Stew recipe from A New Turn in the South (page 193)

Ingredients

  • 4 (6 ounce) portions short ribs, trimmed of connective tissue
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt, plus additional per taste
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 large sweet onion, peeled and coarsely cut into a large dice
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into 1-inch dice
  • 1 celery stalk, leaves removed, cut into 1/2-inch dice
  • 1 dried ancho chile
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 3 cups beef broth
  • 1 15.5 ounce can hominy – yellow or white
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 leek, cleaned and cut into 1/2-inch dice (use just the white and light green parts of the leek)
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons canned roasted green chiles
  • 1 28 ounce can diced tomatoes with juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.
  2. On a large platter or cutting board, lay out the short ribs and evenly rub all sides with salt and pepper.
  3. Heat oil in a cast-iron Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add ribs to the pan and sear on all sides – about 2 minutes per side. If needed, do the ribs in batches.
  4. With ribs still in the Dutch oven, add the onion, carrot and celery. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add the chile, bay leaves, thyme sprig, and red wine. Cook to reduce the wine by half – about 15 minutes.
  6. Add the beef stock and bring to a simmer.
  7. Cover the Dutch oven and place in the preheated oven. Allow to cook for 2 to 2 1/2 hours or until the meat is starting to pull away from the bone.
  8. Remove the short ribs from the Dutch oven and place ribs aside on a large plate or bowl. (You’ll be using the Dutch oven for the final step, so don’t wash it! Instead, lightly wipe out any remaining fat or vegetable matter.)
  9. Using a fine mesh strainer, strain the braising liquid into a 2-cup or larger measuring cup. Discard the onion, celery, bay leaves, thyme and chile.
  10. Skim off all the fat from the surface. If there’s less than 2 cups of braising liquid, add enough beef stock or water to bring it up to 2 cups.
  11. Drain and rinse hominy, and set aside.
  12. Place Dutch oven on stove over medium heat. Add the butter, leek and garlic. Sweat the vegetables for 5 minutes, while occasionally stirring.
  13. Add the roasted green chiles, diced tomato, cumin, thyme, and the 2 cups of braising liquid. Simmer for 5 minutes and season with salt to taste. (While simmering, feel free to scrape the sides of your Dutch oven to add the “brown yummy goodness” from the braising to your vegetables.)
  14. Add the hominy and cook for another 5 minutes.
  15. Add the short ribs to the stew to reheat. Stir to cover the ribs in the stew and cook for 5 minutes.
  16. Turn off heat and stir in the parsley.
  17. Ladle the stew into 4 bowls, placing the ribs on top. Enjoy!
Prep Time: 2 Hours
Cook Time: 4 Hours
Total Time: 6 Hours
Servings: Serves 4
  • Serving size: 1 rib plus 1/4 of stew

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Disclosure: Amazon links are affiliate links. A commission may be earned from a referred sale to their website.

A New Turn in the South: Sweetened Collard Greens

Sweetened Collard Greens

As I mentioned in my post, Getting foodie at the Buick Encore Lifestyle Event, I was very excited to meet Chef Hugh Acheson at his restaurant, Empire State South. I had been to one of his two Athens restaurants, Five & Ten and was a big fan of his from watching Top Chef. (When you have a second, check out Hugh’s terrific blog on the Bravo website.)  I had put off getting a copy of his cookbook, A New Turn in the South: Southern Flavors Reinvented for Your Kitchen, when I had dined at Five & Ten as I was too busy at the time to devote to serious cookbook reading since we had just moved to Georgia. I’m so glad that I did as I not only got a copy at the Buick event, but Hugh signed and personalized it for me. Swoon!

A New Year’s Resolution

When setting up my blogging goals for 2013, I wanted to do something different here at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet. So I decided to share some of Hugh’s healthier and more practical recipes with you this year. I’ll be cooking up some recipes from A New Turn in the South and sharing it here. I hope you enjoy it!

The first food I decided to tackle was collard greens since I had bought a large two pound bag of the stuff on sale, and needed to cook it up pronto! I’d made Tangy Collard Greens at Thanksgiving, and while my husband and I liked them, the kids thought they were too bitter. Well, after reading Hugh’s recipe I had the solution – add something sweet! He recommends sorghum or maple syrup. I used maple syrup since that’s what I had on hand, but I bet agave syrup would work, too.Collard Greens with Ham

Using up what’s in the pantry

I made some changes to Hugh’s recipe since I wanted to use up a few things in my pantry along with the collard greens. First, there was the bacon grease I had leftover from the previous weekend’s breakfast. I figured 1 1/2 tablespoons per pound of collard greens wasn’t too unhealthy and would add a lot of flavor.

I also used thick ham slices (leftover cold cuts from the kids’ lunches) instead of ham hocks and the ham broth that I had made over Thanksgiving and kept in the freezer. (You can use vegetable or chicken stock instead.) I also used regular red wine vinegar instead of the sherry vinegar and left out the pepper flakes in order to entice the kids to eat it. (Lucie refused to but Nathan loved the collard greens and asked for seconds! My husband, Paul, also had seconds while telling me how good the collards tasted.)

This is a dish that takes some time – about an hour. So if you’re making it on a busy weeknight, plan accordingly. To save time, buy prewashed and chopped collard greens, if they’re available at your grocery store. Leftover collard greens taste great cold or heated up in the microwave.

Collard Greens Sweetened with Sorghum

Sweetened Collard Greens

Sweetened Collard Greens

Based on Hugh Acheson’s Collard Greens recipe from A New Turn in the South (page 222)

You’ll need a very large stock pot to cook these in. Initially the collard greens will take up the whole pot, but don’t worry, they’ll cook down. If you don’t have a large pot, divide and cook up a batch in two pots.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons bacon grease or olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 pounds cleaned collard greens, chopped into small pieces (buy these prechopped and cleaned to save time)
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons maple or sorghum syrup
  • 4 cups stock (ham, vegetable or chicken)
  • 3 thick slices black forest ham, diced
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Serve and enjoy!

Directions

  1. Heat the bacon grease or olive oil in a large stock pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the onion and cook until it starts turning color.
  3. Add the collard greens to the pot and sauté for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the vinegar and cook down for 5 minutes.
  5. Add the maple or sorghum syrup, stock, ham, and kosher salt to the pot. Cook over medium heat stirring occasionally until stock is just about gone and collards are tender.
Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Cook Time: 30 Minutes
Total Time: 45 Minutes
Servings: Serves 6
  • Serving size: 1/6 of recipe

Collard Greens with Sorghum and Ham

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Disclosure: Amazon links are affiliate links. A commission may be earned from a referred sale to their website.

I received a complimentary signed copy of A New Turn in the South: Southern Flavors Reinvented for Your Kitchen at the Buick Encore Lifestyle Event. All opinions and experiences are my own.

Hugh Acheson’s Turnips and Their Greens Risotto at the Buick Lifestyle Event

Hugh Acheson's Turnips and Their Greens Risotto at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

Last month, I attended the  Buick Encore Lifestyle Event in Atlanta as the “plus one” of my friend, Eileen Calandro, the Chief Mom Connector of Mom Central. She was invited to test drive the new Buick Encore before it hits dealerships in February, 2013.

Buick Encore Lifestyle Event

I was looking forward to spending time with Eileen while driving a luxurious crossover around the Atlanta metro area including a stop at a local Toys “R” Us to shop for the Toys for Tots program. However, I was just about out of my mind that we would meet celebrity chef and Top Chef Season 10 judge, Hugh Acheson at his restaurant, Empire State South, and tour the Love is Love urban farm. Have fork will travel!

Love is Love Farm at Gaia Gardens

Love is Love Farm

Driving through suburban Decatur, Georgia, you’d never know the Love is Love Farm at Gaia Gardens is there. Yet over 15 years ago, the housing development East Lake Commons was built to include a working, organic farm. The farm grows a surprisingly wide diversity of crops, enough to accommodate a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program.

Joe Reynolds at Love is Love Farm

Our Buick Encore Lifestyle group met with farmer, Joe Reynolds, who showed us around while explaining how the farm manages planting, irrigation, composting, and crop rotation. Joe also told us that the Love is Love farm has a close relationship with many Atlanta restaurants that provide the vegetable scraps for their impressive composting piles. In turn, the farm sells them organic, hyper-local produce, big bags of which we loaded into our Buick Encores to be cooked up for our dinner at Empire State South.

bags of produce from Love is Love

The farm tour was fascinating and I loved Joe’s passion for local, sustainable organic farming. It made me wish I lived closer so I could take advantage of their CSA.

Dinner at Empire State South

After a quick stop back at Twelve Atlantic Station at our gorgeous suite (complete with a full kitchen), Eileen and I were driven in one of the Buick Encores to Empire State South for dinner. Our group hit the bar for cocktails, appetizers and charcuterie. I had two unique cocktails, Orchard Punch, a bourbon drink, and Death on the Moon, made with absinthe. The charcuterie was marvelous, and I’d order it again as a meal, along with a glass of red wine.

Empire State South

Then it was off to a private dining room for a cooking demonstration from Hugh Acheson! He was as funny, personable and down to earth as he appears on Top Chef. He told us a story about appearing on a food panel with Paula Dean. While he likes Paula a lot, he doesn’t agree with her that Southern cooking means fried foods and tons of butter and sugar. Instead, his philosophy is cooking with traditional foods grown in the South, in a modern, sophisticated way.

Hugh Acheson cooking demo at Empire State South

While he demonstrated his Turnips and Their Greens Risotto (recipe included below), Hugh told us about the Southern goodness of Carolina Gold rice and making your own chicken stock in the slow cooker. (Loved that tip!) We sampled the risotto along with our dinner.

First course was Local Lettuces with roasted Brussels leaves, beets, pickled carrots, ESS fromage blanc, and served with a crisp sourdough. Second course was a choice of Roasted Georgia Trout, Chicken Roulade, or Prime Ribeye. (I had the rib eye, which was served rare with celery root and bread gratin, roasted kale with shiitakes, and a shoyu vinaigrette.) For dessert, we had Meyer Lemon Parfait clementine, bergamot brioche, candied cranberry, and sweet potato sorbet.

Eileen and I agreed it was a fabulous meal. I can’t wait to go back to Empire State South with my husband!

Hugh Acheson's Turnips and Their Greens Risotto at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

Turnips and Their Greens Risotto

Ingredients

  • 3 small hakurei turnips
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup minced yellow onion
  • 1 cup Caroline Gold Middland's broken kernel rice
  • 4 cups homemade chicken stock
  • 2 cups finely chopped turnip greens
  • 1/2 cup finely grated (rasp) Parmagiano
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 tablespoon finely cut bias cut onion top for garnish

Directions

  1. Very thinly slice the turnips. Drizzle with olive oil and sea salt and set aside. These will finish the risotto.
  2. Warm your chicken stock in a pot and place a ladle in it. Keep this on the back of the stove. Place a good pot on the stove over medium to medium high heat and add the remaining olive oil. Add the minced onion bulb and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon until the onion is translucent but not charred at all, about five minutes.
  3. Add the rice and lightly glaze the rice. From the moment the rice goes in, the is about 17 minutes to completion, so keep an eye on the clock. You should be stirring a lot but no need to stir all the time.
  4. Start adding the stock, about a cup at a time and stir and cook until the stock is absorbed. Then add more. Repeat. After a while you will see this luxurious, starchy liquid surround those little rice kernels. This is good. After about 15 minutes taste your rice. it should have a slight crunchiness to it but you have to soothsay what it will taste like after two to three more minutes as it sits in the bowl before consumption.
  5. Let's finish this up. Add the butter and the parmesan - and stir well to fold those beautiful finishes into the risotto. Then add the turnip greens to wilt them into the risotto. It's done. When it gets in that bowl it will set up well. Spoon into shallow bowls and garnish with the raw turnips and some more Parmagiano.
  6. EAT.
Prep Time: 15 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour
Total Time: 1 Hour 15 Minutes
Servings: Serves four as a lighter supper
  • Serving size: 1/4 of recipe

More about the Buick Encore Lifestyle Event

Eileen posted about the Buick Encore and our Toys “R” Us shopping spree for Toys for Tots at Luxurious, Affordable Design with the New Buick Encore at Mom Central’s blog. If you love cars and auto design, you'll love her post.

Don't forget to check out the Buick Encore, too! My favorite color is Ruby Red with the Saddle interior. What’s yours?

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Disclosure: I was invited to an all expenses paid editor’s trip by Buick. I also received a signed copy of Hugh Acheson’s cookbook, A New Turn in the South, and some promotional items. All photos except for the Empire State South collage were provided by Buick. All experiences and opinions are my own.

Tangy Collard Greens

Tangy Collard Greens at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.comI wanted to make a Southern style Thanksgiving this year, so of course collard greens had to be part of the meal. While it's a great dish for holiday meals, you can make collard greens any time of year, from fancy sit down dinners to backyard barbecue parties.

Usually, collard greens are made with a bacon or slices of fatty pork, so I tried to health up the recipe – and keep the taste – by using turkey bacon instead. The original recipe also called for six pounds of greens, so I halved it as that was way too much for one meal. Even so, you’ll need to make this in a large pot.

If three pounds of collard greens are too much for your pot, fill it with as much collard greens as possible and cover with a lid. Wait awhile until they cook down and add some more. It’s amazing how much collard greens will shrink down. Also, use presliced collard greens to save time and hassle if they're available in your area of the country.

I used NAKANO’s Red Pepper Seasoned Rice Vinegar instead of cider vinegar. I love how NAKANO’s rice vinegars are already seasoned and sweetened, saving you a few steps in the cooking process. Make sure to keep a bottle on the table in case your dinner guest want to splash on some more!

Finally, to make ham broth, simmer water with a ham bone for two to three hours, then refrigerate and skim off fat. I used the leftover bones and skin from the pig we grilled for our open house party that I had frozen. I put a gallon freezer bag’s worth in a stock pot, covered it with water, and brought it to a boil over high heat. After reducing the heat, I simmered the pig leftovers for a couple of hours and then let the broth cool. Finally, I ran the broth through a fine mesh colander and froze any ham broth I didn’t need for this recipe for my next batch of collard greens!

Tangy Collard Greens at This Mama Cooks! On a Diet - thismamacooks.com

Tangy Collard Greens

Based on a recipe by Chef Ted Lahey of Table and Main, a Southern Tavern in Roswell, Georgia from Local Palate magazine

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound turkey bacon
  • 1/4 pound yellow onions, chopped
  • 1/2 ounce minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 3 pounds collard greens, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon powdered stevia
  • 3 tablespoons NAKANO Red Pepper Seasoned Rice Vinegar
  • 1 cup ham broth

Directions

  1. Cook bacon until it starts to render.
  2. Add onion and garlic and cook until onions are translucent.
  3. Add spices, collard greens, stevia, NAKANO vinegar, and broth. Bring to a simmer.
  4. Reduce heat, cover and cook until green are tender (about one hour).
Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Cook Time: 1 Hour 30 Minutes
Servings: Makes 8 servings.
  • Serving size: 3/4 cup

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Disclosure: Mizkan, the parent company of NAKANO, provided compensation for this post. All opinions and experiences are my own.

Healthy holiday desserts: Holly Clegg’s Red Velvet Cheesecake

Red Velvet CheesecakeWhen Holly Clegg sent over this month’s guest post, I nearly fell off my chair. I mean, Red Velvet Cheesecake, and one that is healthy? She’s a miracle worker!

You can find  more of Holly’s trim& TERRIFIC® recipes at hollyclegg.com and The Healthy Cooking Blog. Don’t forget that Holly’s new cookbook, KITCHEN 101: Secrets to Cooking Confidence, makes a terrific holiday gift, too!

Holiday menus – no thinking required

The holidays are a magical time of fun and festivities, but before you know it, they can turn into one of the busiest, most stressful seasons making your “to do” list longer than ever! And there’s no need to stress about hosting a holiday meal when my new cookbook, Kitchen 101: Secrets to Cooking Confidence, takes the guess work out of meal planning with complete dinner and party menus, no crazy ingredients, just healthy, mouth watering food– no thinking required!

From the “Holiday Heroes” menu of the Ready-Made Menus chapter, the Red Velvet Cheesecake is a luscious combination of American’s favorite dessert with a holiday twist, and best of all you can make ahead and keep in the freezer to pull out before the meal. And, if you want an affordable gift for your neighbor, teacher, or friend, purchase commercially prepared chocolate crusts in foil disposable pans, fill, freeze and give out for the ultimate holiday gift – that’s what I am doing!

Red Velvet Cheesecake

Two popular desserts, red velvet cake and cheesecake create the ultimate indulgence.

Makes 2 (9-inch round) cheesecake pies — 16 servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 (8-ounce) packages reduced-fat cream cheese
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 3 tablespoon cocoa
  • 1 cup nonfat sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 teaspoon vinegar
  • 1 (1-ounce) bottle red food coloring
  • 2 (9-inch) round commercially bought chocolate pie crusts

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven 350° F. In mixing bowl, beat cream cheese and sugar until creamy.
  2. Add eggs, egg white, cornstarch, cocoa, sour cream, vanilla, buttermilk, vinegar and red food coloring, mixing well.
  3. Pour into crust. Bake 35-40 minutes or until center is firm. Turn off oven and remain in oven 30 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled.

Terrific Tidbit: For chocolate crust: 1 1/4 cups chocolate, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract, 2 tablespoons butter melted, combine all, press into bottom of spring form pan, and bake 350°F 10 minutes.

Nutritional information

Per serving:

  • Calories 270
  • Calories from Fat 39%
  • Fat 12g
  • Saturated Fat 5g
  • Cholesterol 46mg
  • Sodium 262mg
  • Carbohydrates 34g
  • Dietary Fiber 1g
  • Total Sugars 23g
  • Protein 7g
  • Dietary Exchanges: 2 1/2 other carbohydrate, 2 1/2 fat

Recipe and photo used with permission of the author.

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Disclosure: Amazon links are affiliate links. A commission may be earned from a referred sale to their website.